Graham to Hold Vote on the Authorization to Subpoena Comey, Brennan, McCabe, Among Others

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) is seeking authorization to subpoena documents and testimony, including from former FBI Director James Comey and former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe. He is looking into those who are connected to the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

In a statement on Monday, the South Carolina senator announced that the Senate Judiciary Committee, which he is the chairman, will debate and vote on subpoena authorization as part of the committee’s investigation into the FBI’s “Crossfire Hurricane” probe and “FISA abuse.”

“Crossfire Hurricane” was an FBI investigation that looked into communication between Russian officials and Trump campaign advisers during the 2016 presidential election.

Graham is seeking authorization for “documents, communications and testimony from witnesses, including James Comey, Andrew McCabe, James Clapper, John Brennan, [and] Sally Yates.” Additionally, former Attorney General Loretta Lynch, FBI Director Christopher Wray, former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein are among the 53 names from the Obama and Trump administrations listed.

The committee’s chairman cannot unilaterally issue a subpoena. It must receive either consent from the ranking member — which would be Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) — or garner a majority committee vote, and is only issued by the chairman.

The vote on the subpoena authorization is expected to occur on June 4.

Also covered under the subpoena authorization include “Documents and communications referenced in, and testimony at a hearing or deposition of any individual named or identified by pseudonym in, the report titled ‘Review of Four FISA Applications and Other Aspects of the FBI’s Crossfire Hurricane Investigation’ issued by the U.S. Department of Justice Inspector General,” the announcement reads.

As IJR previously reported, President Donald Trump recently pressed Graham to call on former President Barack Obama to testify before the committee as part of a probe into the origins of the Russia investigation.

“Just do it,” Trump tweeted on May 14, adding, “No more Mr. Nice Guy.”

However, Graham — who is a close ally of Trump — pushed back, as he told The Hill, “I think it would be a bad precedent to compel a former president to come before the Congress. That would open up a can of worms, and for a variety of reasons, I don’t think that’s a good idea.”

Published in IJR